The Imposter Syndrome, Sydney Prayer Breakfast and For the Love of God

Key dates for prayer

24 May - The Edge - It's Ok, You belong

Ever feel like you’re a fraud? That you’re just not cut out for your job? And that someday, you’re going to be found out—and cast out?

You’re not alone. Tech billionaires, Hollywood celebrities, award-winning authors, business executives, and many other highly capable individuals all suffer from Imposter Syndrome: the persistent fear of being a fake.

Come hear two speakers grapple with their imposter experience, the strategies they use to keep their fear of phoniness at bay, and then pose your own questions to them.

You might find you’re in good company.

Come along to The Edge to hear from two thought leaders in this field of study. After the talks, Dr. Sam Chan of City Bible Forum will allow you to interview the speakers and take them to the edge of the topic

Speakers:

Dr. Justine Toh is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Public Christianity. She worked at Fairfax Digital and Reuters Australia before completing her doctorate in Cultural Studies at Macquarie University. Justine speaks and writes about the way the Christian story renews all of life, and is especially interested in exploring big questions of meaning and purpose through the (seemingly) mundane moments of the everyday.

Steve King is the Senior Product Manager for Enterprise offerings at Atlassian, sits on industry boards and panels and is a passionate advocate for social impact and early-stage corporate philanthropy with Pledge 1%. Steve speaks and teaches about modern teamwork, abstract problem solving and product management for startups. Do more with less, and always do what you love to.

30 May - Sydney Prayer Breakfast

The Sydney Prayer Breakfast is an annual prayer gathering of Christians from all denominations who work or live in the Sydney CBD.

Join 1,200 other Christian business professionals as we pray for the welfare of our city and encourage one another in our walk with God.

Speaker: Os Guiness

12 June - For the Love of God

How the Church is better and worse than you ever imagined

Christian history offers plenty of ammunition to its critics

Crusades, inquisitions, witch trials, the oppression of women - not to mention the horrific incidence of child abuse, covered up in recent decades by the institutional church

For the Love of God: How the church is better and worse than you ever imagined is a documentary by the Centre for Public Christianity. It addresses the worst of what Christians have done, but also traces the origins of Western values like human rights, charity, humility, and non-violence back to the influence of Jesus.

This is not the history we think we know. Join us as we weigh up the good, the bad, the ugly - and the unexpected - impact Christianity has had on the world we live in.

How the Church is better and worse than you ever imagined

Christianity may be the wellspring for many of our most cherished values today, but Christians should be the first to admit that there’s been plenty of bloodshed along the way.

John Dickson is founding Director of the Centre for Public Christianity. He has a degree in theology and a doctorate in ancient history, specialising in the birth of Christianity. An ordained Anglican minister, he is also a Senior Research Fellow of the Department of Ancient History, Macquarie University, and he teaches a course on the Historical Jesus at the University of Sydney. He has hosted two nationally televised documentaries (The Christ Files and Life of Jesus), authored over a dozen books and is a busy public speaker.

Simon Smart is Executive Director of the Centre for Public Christianity. A former English and History teacher, Simon has a Masters in Christian Studies from Regent College, Canada. He has years of experience writing and editing both academic curricula and popular books. He is the author of For God's Sake: An Atheist, a Jew, a Christian and a Muslim Debate Religion, and editor of A Spectator's Guide to Worldviews.

Justine Toh is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Public Christianity. She worked at Fairfax Digital and Reuters Australia before completing her doctorate in Cultural Studies at Macquarie University. Justine speaks and writes about the way the Christian story renews all of life, and is especially interested in exploring big questions of meaning and purpose through the (seemingly) mundane moments of the everyday.

Thank you for your prayers and support,

The Matthews